WHAT WE OFFER

  • TIME & COST SAVINGS ON RECRUITMENT

  • RETENTION OF QUALITY DRIVERS

  • SOLUTIONS TO CHANGING DRIVER NEEDS

DRIVER SOLUTIONS

MYCO PROVIDES SOLUTIONS TO COMMON RECRUITMENT CHALLENGES

DRIVER SHORTAGE

For the fifth consecutive year, the driver shortage topped the American Transportation Research Institute’s (ATRI) top 10 overall industry concerns. The complete results of the annual survey were released as part of the  American Trucking Associations’ Management Conference & Exhibition.

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INELIGIBLE DRIVERS &
DRIVER
FLEXIBILITY

During a panel discussion on FMCSA’s Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse, it was learned that as of October 2021, 91,370 drivers had been declared ineligible because of a positive drug test and only 18,926 have applied for reinstatement. 53% were for marijuana or THC-related violations, and 13% were for drivers who refused to take a drug test.

 

The nature of driving is changing as recruiters say they hear more drivers want positions in which they are home more and driving regionally, rather than longer over-the-road trips.

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TURNOVER, LOW WAGES & HIGH RISK

Consistently high turnover rates, combined with lower wages, restricted hours, unfair treatment, increased risk and time away from family are some of the dirty truths that are seldom discussed in regard to driver shortages.

 

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SHORTAGES & INFLATION

Equipment shortages, supply chain issues, high diesel prices — these issues are making a tough job even tougher for truck drivers across the U.S. This, in turn, can make it difficult on driver recruiting and retention.

Equipment supply chain issues are clearly leading to driver frustration, with orders for new tractors still constrained by part delays and labor shortages, equipment issues are not going away any time soon. The potential of this trend continuing this year and possibly beyond. Managing driver expectations during the equipment shortage is a key factor in driver retention.

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2022 INDUSTRY STATISTICS

One of the leading problems the industry is currently facing is the shortage of truck drivers. According to the American Trucking Association, the industry has been struggling with this problem on and off since 2015. One of the leading causes keeping the driver shortage high is the high average age of the current workforce. With the average age of truck drivers reaching 46 years and above, these existing drivers have or will start to retire, and the industry is struggling to replace them.

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RECRUITMENT & RETENTION

Recruiting and retaining an adequate number of qualified truck drivers consistently ranks as a top trucking industry concern, according to the American Transportation Research Institute. Even before the pandemic struck, estimates from the American Trucking Associations had the driver shortage topping 100,000 by 2023 due to projected freight growth, industry retirements, and competition from other industries.

To recruit new talent and keep the workforce it already has, commercial trucking companies are taking a hard look at their own operations to focus more on growth and improvement from within. That means getting creative and continuously working with drivers, technicians, dispatchers, and other back-office staff.

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